Wild Rose’s Weaving

Rose’s grandmother teaches her how to weave a rug and, in the process, teaches her about creativity, the influence of nature, and the interplay between art and life.


Picture Book | Ages 3 – 7
Hardcover ISBN: 978-1-933718-56-9 | 32 pages | $15.95
Ebook ISBN: 978-1-933718-64-4 | $15.99
Guided reading level: J | Grade level: 2 | Reading Recovery level: 17

Meet the Author & Illustrator


Ginger ChurchillGinger Churchill’s own grandmother is an oil-painter and master seamstress, while her mother crochets, cross-stitches, knits and continually tries new arts-like basket weaving. As a child Ginger came to the conclusion that art is an essential part of life. In fact, she came to believe that life itself is an art form. How we choose to live, the things we say and do, can bring peace and beauty to the world just like Grandma’s rug does for Wild Rose. When Ginger was learning to weave on an upright loom, a beautiful little girl named Winter Rose ran through the weavers with her dog, hopping on laps here and there to add her own touch to each rug. Winter Rose’s grandmother lamented about the children she knew having little desire to learn their native arts and Ginger’s idea for Wild Rose’s Weaving was born. It is her hope that each person will find joy in expressing pieces of themselves and their lives through whatever art they choose.

Author Website


Nicole Wong

Nicole was born in Fall River, Massachusetts, with both parents in the arts—her dad was a designer and painter, and her mom was a fashion illustrator and art teacher.

Nicole received her first freelance illustration job when she was 12. As she grew up, she wanted to learn more, and graduated from RISD with a BFA in illustration.

Now she’s a happy full-time illustrator of magazines, children’s educational and trade books. She still lives in Fall River with her husband, their daughter, sleepy kitty, and two big pups.

Illustrator Website

Behind the Book – Weavings


While the art of weaving binds us together across the world, it also ties us to centuries past. People have woven all around the globe beginning in prehistoric times. There are ancient Egyptian pictures of looms that look just like the one Wild Rose uses in the story. These looms are still used today in many countries including North and South America, India, Turkey, Iran, Liberia, and the list goes on and on.

Weaving is not just for expressing yourself, it’s infinitely useful. Weavers make blankets, carpets, bracelets, bags, belts, and fabric for all kinds of clothing. Look around you. Chances are you’ll see something woven-maybe a rug or even the denim for your jeans. And you can weave many different materials: wool, silk, sticks, wire and paper to name a few.

Wild Rose’s Weaving Reviews


“A charmingly illustrated picture book.”
School Library Journal

“A cozy celebration of simple joys in life and of a treasured art form lovingly passed from one generation to the next. Churchill’s spare, peaceful words and Wong’s pastel watercolors offer up a lovely sentiment about storytelling—that it comes in different forms, even through the patterns of yarn in a rug”
Booklist

“Churchill reminds us that like Grandma and Wild Rose, to bequeath these traditional arts to younger generations is a precious gift to embrace and cherish. . . . Illustrator Wong’s signature delicate lines and softly glowing colors move effortlessly between Wild Rose’s whirlwind adventures and Grandma’s patient artistry. The effect is indeed a “picture of life” – an inviting celebration to join in.”
Book Dragon, Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program

“Wong’s watercolor illustrations and Churchill’s touching story charmingly convey the common misunderstandings between old and young—and the places where they can come together to share adventure and imagination.”
Citybookreview.com